‘Rootsy. Alternative. Melancholic.’ | Interview with Pultixima

They lie. They always lie.

There’s a touching melancholia to Pultixima’s sound. Enchanters is not just a song. It is art. Pultixima reflects his worldview through his music. Dive in!

Describe your sound in 3 words

Rootsy. Alternative. Melancholic.

Tell us a few things about your new song Enchanters. What is the story behind it?

Enchanters is one of the songs that I’ve been working on in a series that explores different forms of magic. With this particular track, I wanted to put aside witchcraft and explore something grounded in everyday life. I thought the power of persuasion was an interesting angle. We’ve all been allured by another person, whether through their words, their reputation, or their looks.

It often feels like we live in a time where constructive, thoughtful discourse takes too much effort, so it’s easier to let slogans and single-sentence quotations do the talking for us. It’s simple, it’s catchy, it’s consumable.

That charm can be used as an advantage, oftentimes insidiously. This idea of charm and willful surrender drew me back, over and over again, to images of my own country; citizens slapping divisive bumper stickers on their vehicles, wearing their favored politician’s name across $40 campaign t-shirts. It often feels like we live in a time where constructive, thoughtful discourse takes too much effort, so it’s easier to let slogans and single-sentence quotations do the talking for us. It’s simple, it’s catchy, it’s consumable. It doesn’t ask for us to go deeper and question our entrenched loyalties to others. I think we unknowingly surrender a bit of our own identity by branding ourselves like that. We run the risk of becoming servile to the people and systems that are intended to serve us in kind. I thought that was a cautionary message worth writing about.

Enchanters has a Mystagogic vibe. In which state of mind do you imagine people might listen to your music?

That’s an interesting question. The melody is meant to give off a hypnotic vibe and the lyrics are meant to arouse suspicion. The intent was to find a vibe akin to a drunken stupor, where inhibitions are lowered and free thought could be hijacked. I like to think it has a similar approach to the python’s song in The Jungle Book, urging you to trust in it without consenting to it. So ideally, I’d hope for the vibe to impart a trancelike submission and lack of sobriety. I want it to feel like the kind of darkness that comforts you as it gradually devours you.

You are a solo artist. Do you like the idea of collaborating? Is songwriting a lonely process?

(Laughs) Yes. On both accounts. Music was always a private interest of mine. In truth, the pandemic was the catalyst for my music going public. The constant isolation became at times a bit too much to handle, and I found a great deal of comfort communicating and sharing tracks with other musicians around the world during the quarantine.

I’m in love with the loneliness, under the condition that it’s up to me to decide when I want to be a recluse. I’m the person that holds my breath at the bottom of the deep end of the pool for as long as I can.

It challenged me to answer questions I never considered, like what my overall sound was, or what it meant to me, or whether it was interesting to others. I was grateful to find out that I had an audience. Those interactions have helped me to step out of my comfort zone and collaborate in other’s tracks as well as reach out for occasional collaborations on my own music. But in earnest, I’m in love with the loneliness, under the condition that it’s up to me to decide when I want to be a recluse. I’m the person that holds my breath at the bottom of the deep end of the pool for as long as I can. I find I can achieve my sound through submerging into that solitude and then coming back up for air when it’s life or death. I don’t know. I vacillate between extremes.

Favorite album of the past decade?

That’s a tough one. I find myself spending more and more time listening to smaller, unsigned independent artists in recent years. I know I’m cheating the question here, but…some of my favorite albums of the past decade have been Low’s Double Negative, The Internet’s Ego Death, Kendrick Lamar’s To Pimp A Butterfly, Hiatus Kaiyote’s Choose Your Weapon, Atoms For Peace’s AMOK. That’s a big question. It’s hard to pick one. But Low’s sound has captivated me the most as of late. Probably because of the cold.

Which board/video game should we play while listening to your music?

I’d love to say Bloodborne, since that’s my favorite video game of all time. But probably the more ideal choice would be something like Limbo or INSIDE or even Little Nightmares. Something that teases more but leaves it all to the visuals and soundscape to tell. The more gloomy and cryptic, the better.

What is the story behind your name?

Some years ago, I had it in my head that I was going to write a series of mythology tales. I wrote a collection of several short stories that I still intend to finish one day, but I tabled them until I had my inspiration back. One of the stories was about the construction of an absurdly overbearing idol when the gods felt spurned. The name of that idol was “Pulitxima”. When I made my public artist debut, I thought I would carry that name forward because it had a unique identity to it. It also felt like it was for me and not attempting to be anything more than that. The songs I’ve recently written sound a lot like those stories in a way, actually, so I hope that the name defines itself as time goes on as some magnificently terrible spectacle by design.

What isn’t a crime but should be?

Oh, food waste. Hands down. It blows my mind how much food is thrown away. One of my biggest pet peeves is seeing someone order a whole dish at a restaurant and push 80% of it to the side (mainly the healthy parts) to eat just the starch and meat. It’s a crime to the hungry. It’s a crime to the chef. Be honest with yourselves…order starch and meat. Don’t waste wonderfully prepared dishes because you aren’t secure enough in yourself to just admit what you’re going to eat. Grocery stores should give anything leftover to shelters or needy families. Also, take home and eat your leftovers. It’s probably not as big of a concern in Europe…but it’s a blessing Americans get portions in these tremendous sizes. Seeing it tossed out infuriates and saddens me. It’s a problem that shouldn’t even exist where I live and yet it does.

Thank you!

Follow Pultixima
Facebook/Instagram

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s